Grants for musicians

The last of our bunch today, Niccolò Piccinni was born in Bari in 1728. He lived a prolific life as a composer in his day, producing operas, symphonies, concertos and chamber music, although today his works are sadly, rarely performed. His operas in particular, of which he composed around eighty, were performed frequently in Rome and abroad in most major European cities.

One of the best things you can do as a working producer is to analyze music by the artists who inspire you. This will help you understand how they build their tracks, and develop their ideas for when you start working on how things are arranged and orchestrated.

The 1% skim milk of the music industry has survived the barbarians at the gate, born again within the world of music streaming. In 2019, the listener pays only a little more for the convenience of streaming, but the money they do pay is vacuumed up by large tech and labels via the gated publishing communities like Spotify, Apple Music, and Google Play. Artists still struggle, as the innovations of tech revolutionaries were co-opted and sanitized by corporate interest.

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Banker: Um. Okay. Do you have any proof of income?

Comparing yourself to other singers is a recipe for disaster. The trick to cementing your confidence is by finding your niche — working to discover that thing that makes your singing completely unique. Whether it is that you can belt like a demon, hold a note for two minutes, have a sexy glottal growl, a husky sultry tone, a perfectly seamless vibrato… Whatever it is, it’s your task to identify it, master it, and exploit it!

Avoid this by following the 3:1 rule, which stipulates that the distance between multiple mics should be at least three times the distance between the close mic and the source. For example, if you have a close mic 8″ from the sound hole of your acoustic guitar, your ambient mic should be at least 24″ away from the other mic, or the same sound source. The big change in amplitude between the two signals will mitigate the comb filtering, and you can accentuate this by angling the mics in different directions (provided it sounds good).

Here’s a winning formula: the guitar starts out with the song’s main riff, completing a full cadence, before the bass ensues with a countermelody high up on the neck, building up a suspenseful intro until the drums kick in and carry the song into its full tempo. “Hotel California” operates the same way.

Tom Hamilton’s signature riff may be “Sweet Emotion,” but there are so many other songs where his sheer bass heroics are overshadowed by Joe Perry’s monster riffs. If you listen closely to one of the mid-song guitar solos in “Walk This Way,” counting off six beats after the line, “Just give me a kiss,” you’ll hear Hamilton’s gorgeous slide up the neck up to a trill-like sequence at the octave, ending with a three-note chromatic run to the major third above it.

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+ Read more on Flypaper: Thinking of touring to the great white Canadian north? Here’s our guide to the best venues, record stores, cafés, and galleries in Montréal. Go on — get booking!

Here’s a curveball for you! Even though at this point, Pinterest has gotten so big I’m not technically sure it can be considered a blog anymore, it remains an excellent place to get inspired on almost every level. Whether hunting for beautiful imagery for your tour poster or album cover, or a quote to boost your idea generation, it’s definitely worth visiting when you’re wracking your brain.

This post is part of Flypaper’s Home Recording Week, where we’re sharing tips and insights from our community on home recording and production workflow. Read our featured articles here, or sign up for our weekly newsletter to make sure you never miss a beat!

“I Want It That Way” was the epitome of boy-band ballads, the high-water mark of a guilty-pleasure genre that everyone, eventually, grows out of. The amount of times I’ve seen gaggles of people singing this at karaoke is astounding. Every word’s been ingrained in my head. Today, our teenagers listen and do their best to sing along to a Korean pop boy-band, which kind of begs a lot of questions about whether we really need to grow out of anything? Let alone understand it…

As for listening, I love heavy grooves, but I also love music with a huge sound and epic quality, which could be anything from a John Williams film score to Ella Fitzgerald singing with a bombastic big band, to massive EDM and other electronic tracks—I think they have more in common aurally than most might realize.